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Three Tips to Retain Your Top Employees

A recent article by CNBC highlighted a trend often seen in economies emerging from a recession. As the number of companies considering hiring begins to rise, individuals gain confidence in their marketability, and turnover increases. Although an improving economy is good for business, higher staff turnover increases recruitment costs. Moreover, a competitive labor market means that skilled workers may be harder to find. So how can you keep the team you’ve worked so hard to build? If employees are sitting at their desks contemplating other opportunities, how can you make sure they stay committed and loyal to your organization? 3 Read More

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What Are Great Managers Doing Differently?

A book by Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman entitled “First, Break All the Rules: What the World’s Greatest Managers Do Differently” has a new take on human resource management. The book presents the findings of a Gallup survey with over 80,000 managers of successful organizations. The conclusion is that successful managers focus on developing the natural talents that employees already possess and hire other employees to compensate for weaknesses. This strategy is in contrast to the traditional HR perception which advocates developing the weaknesses in existing employees. Instead of identifying areas that require development because of a lack of expertise, Read More

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Make Your Employees Leaders (Not Followers!)

Not every employee has leadership potential. Some individuals prefer to work alone, independently, and demonstrate incredible creativity doing so. However, many employees who possess a drive to lead are inadequately prepared for such a visible role. They often find themselves struggling with the responsibility and expectations that are suddenly part of their daily routine. Scott Edinger, contributor to Forbes, uses the example of Michael Jordan to address the transition of an employee to a leadership role. Jordan, although an iconic basketball player, did not perform so well as a manager in the NBA. Edinger provides suggestions for employers who would Read More

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Can You Afford to Wait for Another Candidate to Apply?

Hiring an employee constitutes a long-term commitment. It is understandable to hesitate when making a decision that, if not the right one, could prove extremely costly later. A recent survey by Careerbuilder estimated the cost of a bad hire at more than $50,000. However, the labor market is expected to become more competitive as the economy picks up, and a delay in hiring decisions can mean that a company loses a prized candidate. The chosen interview style can reveal a lot about a candidate. Behavioral interviews are a good way to understand how a candidate might react in a certain Read More

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Perks to Offer your Employees to Keep Them Loyal to Your Company

A problem that may beset employers as hiring starts to increase is lost resources associated with staff turnover. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, job hopping is a trend. In January 2012, the average time in a job for a worker was just 4.6 years. For industries with a younger workforce, such as the hospitality industry, this number is even lower at 2.4 years. For employers, keeping your staff loyal may be a primary concern as the economy improves. Nadia Goodman, contributor to Entrepreneur, recommends meeting the needs of your employees. If staff morale is high and employees find Read More