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Background Checks: Know Your Rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FRCA)

More companies are conducting background checks on potential employees and your hiring, or a promotion, may depend on the information that is revealed. Certain jobs require background checks by federal and state law such as teaching or government work. It is useful to be aware of your rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) and how you can prepare for a background check. An employer may want to verify that they are hiring responsibly, that you have not committed child abuse, acts for terrorism, fraud, that your resume is valid, or that you do not have a pattern of Read More

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Recent Employment Trends in Washington DC

In March 2012, Forbes reported that Washington, D.C. was one city that had emerged relatively unscathed from the recent recession and had been buoyed economically by federal spending. The federal government accounts for one-third of the area’s economy and is the area’s largest employer. However, the effects of recent fiscal cuts and sequestration by the federal government are reflected in the latest labor statistics. Will the recent government shutdown have a long-lasting impact on the area’s economy? Only time will truly tell. The Washington Post reports that the visible signs of a vibrant economy, such as cranes and construction for Read More

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Illegal Reasons for Firing an Employee

Letting an employee go is probably the least enviable task for an employer and one that can come with a cost. Few companies can boast a 100 percent recruitment success rate and a volatile economic environment requires a flexible staffing strategy with the inevitable increases and decreases in human resources. Most workers in the United States are considered to be “at will” and can be fired as long as an employer’s reasons for doing so are legal. The main management issues to consider are the following: Discrimination. Federal law states that an employee cannot be fired because of reasons related

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Staying Top of the Short list with a Successful Follow-Up Email

The number of applicants who do send a follow-up thank you email to interviewers is around 60 percent according to US News. While there is no evidence that a thank you note will land you the job if you are not first on the list, second place on the short list may if the top candidate withdraws. Here are some tips with respect to a follow-up thank you note or email: An email is acceptable and should be sent within 24 hours of the interview to cement a good impression. Correctly spell each interviewer’s name; use LinkedIn to search them Read More